Super Adulting: Should We Move Out or Keep Living with Parents?

Oh my God why did I move out?  Why do I want to grow up and support myself? So that I can have my own parties or “boys” over?  Once we pay our first month’s rent that is over a grand, we start feeling a lump in our throat.  I always wondered why the school system never taught us logical Adulting things like how to pay rent.  What about how to set up your utilities.  How do we make a budget?  Nope. Instead, the school thinks, “Oh these students really need to know how to find the circumference of a circle.  How to find out when a train from Texas will arrive in California.” School believes these students need to take four years of Spanish in high school but still not be fluent.  Por Que? (WHY)

The truth about renting:

What they don’t teach us is that if we don’t pay your rent, we will get a three days notice to move out.  If we get evicted, there goes our credit and there will be an eviction on our records for years.  We will have trouble finding a place to live and we may be forced to live with parents or be homeless.  Why did they never teach us that our credit score was basically the most important thing?Most important thing like ever

The truth about credit:

Many of my college friends got their first credit card and immediately started swiping.  One girl had to quit school when she got over $5,000 dollars of debt.  I used to get about five credit card offers a week and my mother warned me about overspending.  So a big part of adulting is making sure those three numbers in your credit score are high enough to exist.  Literally, if it’s too low then you can’t rent an apartment, a car, or buy a house. 

What’s funny is that my credit is pretty good but then the credit report always says that I haven’t had credit long enough.  It says 10 years is not long enough. Go Figure.  This is how serious it is.  It can take a decade to even fix and improve your credit. 

The truth about living on your own:

So luckily, my parents never forced me to move out but I moved out because I wanted independence after college. Why? I have no idea. Independence comes with a big cost.  And unlike other consequences, this cost is actually very quantifiable. Bills, utilities, gas, food, and furniture.  Why does furniture cost so much?  Like even a chair is over a hundred dollars. 

Then, there is food.  How did my mother cook something different every day for years? For me, it takes me all my effort to run up to the store or sit in the drive through to buy fast food.  These days, I can just use Uber EATS app to deliver. Then, when food is delivered, I barely want to go outside to meet the person with the food.  Being alone to feed yourself is no fun.  I have to make a conscious effort to go to the grocery store and cook if I want to save money.

Next, to paying rent and paying for a car, food is the next big expense.  And you can’t just stop eating. Prepare to spend hundreds of dollars a month just to eat. Then, your waist starts getting larger and larger because you’re not cooking every night like your mother. 

Then, you start looking at your bills and your father’s voice comes into your head, “Why is the door open? Are we air conditioning the whole neighborhood?”  I knew I had hit adulthood when I carefully turned off every light before I leave the room and curse at myself for accidentally leaving the air conditioning on. 

Sometimes, I sit and imagine.  What if I stayed at home and pocketed $1,000 every month.  That’s $12,000 a year?  I could buy expensive clothes a month for $1,000 or fancy vacations. My mother could be fixing me dinner every night and doing my laundry.

Instead, I’m over here searching my couch cushions for change for the laundry room.  Nobody tells you that if you live alone, you literally are by yourself. No chatter or laughter in the other room.  Just silence.  And then your mind wanders and you think, “What will I do if I am robbed because no one else is home to save me?”  So you have to think about spending money on an alarm or a guard dog, which is another FRIGGIN’ EXPENSE.

Conclusion:

So I could have just stayed home with my parents and become a Millennial stereotype. Instead, I chose to leave the nest and become an adult.  Apparently, the cost of having boys over is about $1,000 a month.  I may just get tempted to move back home and I might just have to go back to sneaking boys in.  Just Kidding mom and dad I never ever did that.  or did I?? Wink Wink.

About Teri Johnson 16 Articles
Find me drinking coffee in the AM and wine in the PM.

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